Residential Substance Abuse Treatment (RSAT) Program

The Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act, USPL 90-351, Title I, 82 stat.197 (1968), as amended, provides funds to the states, through the Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners (RSAT) Program, to develop or enhance substance abuse treatment programs for offenders. The Act authorizes the U.S. Attorney General to award formula grants for substance abuse treatment programs in state and local correctional facilities.

The RSAT Program was administered by the Corrections Program Office, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Recent re-organization, now places the RSAT Program under the Bureau of Justice Assistance, OJP, USDOJ.

 On Guam, the State Administrative Agency (SAA) for the RSAT Program is the Bureau of Statistics and Plans. The RSAT Program is implemented by the Guam Department of Corrections.

The purpose of the RSAT program is to develop and implement residential substance abuse programs that provide individual and group treatment activities for offenders in residential facilities operated by state and local correctional agencies.

The RSAT Program requirements include the following:

  • Last between 6 and 12 months. Each offender must participate in the program for not less than 6 or more than 12 months, unless he or she drops out or is terminated.

  • Be provided in residential treatment facilities set apart from the general correctional population. Set apart means a totally separate facility or a dedicated housing unit within a facility exclusively for use by program participants.

  • Focus on the substance abuse problems of the inmate.

  • Develop the inmate’s cognitive, behavioral, social, vocational, and other skills to solve the substance abuse and related problems.

  • Implement or continue to require urinalysis and/or other proven forms of drug and alcohol testing.

  • Preferably, participation in the RSAT Program should be limited to inmates who have 6 – 12 months left in their term of confinement so that they can be released from prison after completing the treatment program, rather than being returned to the general prison population.